WAND DAC Webinar Series Dashboard

Welcome to the WAND Diversity Action Committee 3-Part Webinar Series Dashboard! This page is your one stop shop for all the details regarding the series; presentations, handouts, references, recordings, etc.

 

Part 1 - Building a Foundation of Social Justice Language, Concepts and Resources

(Conducted on September 23, 2020)

Session Description: Addressing systemic racism and pervasive inequities across nutrition and dietetics includes possessing an understanding of U.S.-based racial dynamics and race relations. Part 1 of this 3-part series focuses on building a foundation of language and concepts, which includes guidelines for facilitating authentic and productive discussion.

Speaker: Erika Anna, MS, RDN

Erika Anna, MS, RDN is an Assistant Faculty Associate within the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She teaches undergraduate students, leading a learning community entitles, "We Are What We Eat: Food and Identity." "We Are What We Eat," critically examines food and nutrition and its relationship to humans and their biological, social, and physical environment; learning community goals include: consciousness of self and others, awareness of history's impact on the present, ability to recognize and questions assumptions. The foundation of Erika's work includes professional and community partnerships to produce culturally and historically relevant programming.

Erika engages in nutrition education, and outreach with a focus on culturally relevant food and nutrition programming. Focus audiences include dietitians and dietetic interns, nutrition educators and outreach specialists, and the general public. She completed her MS thesis entitled: Addressing the Gap in Culturally Relevant Programming within Dietetics Education (2019), leading to professional interest in the provision of culture-centered food and nutrition care; the inter-generational basis for nutrition-related chronic disease, trauma-informed care; food insecurity and nutrition-related disease connected to structural racism, land removal and dispossession; foodways (food culture and history), Food Sovereignty, and asset-based community development.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Describe key terms and concepts related to bias and ethnocentric behavior
  • Explain levels of societal racism
  • Identify ally resources related to nutrition and dietetics

Handouts:

If you are interested in writing down any notes from your post-webinar work, or have questions on the material, you can access the Google Doc for that here.

Click here to review the recording


Part 2 - Combating Structural Racism and Nutrition-related Health Disparities 

(Conducted on October 7, 2020)

Session Description: Using key terms and concepts related to how implicit biases and structural racism can shape health outcomes within Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), part 2 of this series focuses on the impact racism has on the social determinants of health and subsequently nutrition-related health disparities. Working from the mind-set of an asset-based approach, participants will gain an awareness and appreciation of community-led work improving the health within Wisconsin communities.

Speakers: 

Dr. Enrique Caballero, MD, Endocrinologist, Investigator, Educator

Dr. Caballero is an Endocrinologist and Clinical Investigator. He is the Director of Latino Diabetes Health in the Division of Endocrinology an Associate Scientist in the Division of Global Health Equity at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA.

He is currently the Chair for the Health Care Disparities Committee at the American Diabetes Association. He is also the Director of International Innovation Programs in the Office for External Education and the Director of Diabetes Education in the Postgraduate Medical Education Department at Harvard Medical School where he leads the development of education programs that benefit health care professionals and patients around the world.

Dr. Caballero has had a strong and long commitment to help underserved populations. He founded the Latino Diabetes Initiative at the Joslin Diabetes Center and the Diabetes Program within the Spanish Clinic at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, both affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Caballero has been actively involved in multiple activities aiming at eliminating health care disparities through national and international organizations such as the National Hispanic Medical Association, the National Minority Quality Forum, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the Latin American Diabetes Association, among others.

Through multiple activities in the areas of patient care, patient education, community outreach, clinical research and professional education, his work has favorably impacted the lives of thousands of people and families with diabetes or at risk for the disease. His research interests include type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention as well as management of diabetes in racial/ethnic minorities. He has been a co-investigator of the National Diabetes Prevention Program, the LookAhead Program and the Diabetes Education Study, all sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Jon Greendeer, Health and Wellness Coordinator, Ho-Chunk Nation

Jon Greendeer is a graduate of UW-Marathon County and went on to complete his Bachelors in Political Science from UW-Stevens Point in 2004. Upon completion, he was appointed as the Executive Administrative Officer for the Ho-Chunk Nation overseeing the administrative and financial day-to-day operations. With his Workplace Mediation Certification, Jon worked with employees and employers to implement effective conflict resolution strategies. Jon was elected President of Ho-Chunk Nation and served from 2011-2015, was appointed as the Executive Director of Heritage Preservation and now works as the Health and Wellness Coordinator focused on culturally informed diabetes and obesity prevention approaches through models of community-integrated indigenous and sustainable food systems. Jon resides in Stevens Point, WI with his wife, Christine Munson and has two daughters; Brittany, 27, Rio, 15 and his grandchild, Scarlett. Jon enjoys woodworking, traditional brain-tanning hides, exercising, playing his guitars and mostly, spending time outdoors with his family gathering or preparing foods.

Tatiana Maida, Healthy Choices Department Manager, Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers

Tatiana Maida has over a decade of work in Public Health and Obesity that has impacted the lives of thousands of adults and children in the southside of Milwaukee. She has served in several Boards in Milwaukee and at the State level where she is a strong advocate for equity and the need to include community voice in decision making process. Her passion and expertise are in the areas of Community Leadership, Health Equity, and Cultural Humility.

Teresa L. Turner, MS, RD, LDN, SNS, FAND, Maryland Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics President-Elect

Teresa is the Army Child & Youth Services (CYS) Nutritionist at Fort George G. Meade, MD. She manages the food service operations of three child development centers, two school-aged centers and one middle school/teen center while also functioning as Meade CYS’s Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Administrator. Formerly, Teresa was a Program Coordinator & Nutrition Educator for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) with Cooperative Extension at the University of the District of Columbia (UDC).

She has regarded the field of Dietetics as her passion for over 19 years; focusing ardently on child nutrition during the past eight years. She immensely enjoys public speaking and providing education and training as a means to share and utilize her zeal. Teresa received her B.S. degree in dietetics from the historical Tuskegee University, her M.S. degree in nutrition and dietetics from UDC, and completed her dietetic internship at Iowa State University. She currently serves as President-elect of the Maryland Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (MAND) and looks forward to what her service will contribute to the community and to the profession.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Describe historical and present-day factors related to the prevalence of disease within U.S.-based communities experiencing highest rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and stroke
  • Explain the importance of an asset-based approach to patient care and community partnerships
  • Identify community-based programs and resources fostering resilience, and improving health outcomes

Handouts:


Part 3 - Cultural Humility within Dietetics Practice

(Conducted on October 15, 2020)

Session Description: The 3-part webinar series concludes with an exploration of the shift toward cultural humility and the provision of culture-centered food and nutrition care. Participants gain an appreciation of the numerous factors influencing food habits, and an understanding that food, culture, and identity are often inseparable, and therefore must be part of a successful food and nutrition intervention.

Speakers:

Erika Anna, MS, RDN

Erika Anna is an Assistant Faculty Associate within the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. She teaches undergraduate students, leading a learning community entitles, "We Are What We Eat: Food and Identity." "We Are What We Eat," critically examines food and nutrition and its relationship to humans and their biological, social, and physical environment; learning community goals include: consciousness of self and others, awareness of history's impact on the present, ability to recognize and questions assumptions. Erika engages in nutrition education, and outreach with a focus on culturally relevant food and nutrition programming. The foundation of Erika's work includes professional and community partnerships to produce culturally and historically relevant programming.

Tatiana Maida

Tatiana Maida has over a decade of work in Public Health and Obesity that has impacted the lives of thousands of adults and children in the southside of Milwaukee. She has served in several Boards in Milwaukee and at the State level where she is a strong advocate for equity and the need to include community voice in decision making process. Her passion and expertise are in the areas of Community Leadership, Health Equity, and Cultural Humility.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Apply principles of cultural humility within dietetics practice
  • Appreciate the complexity of the factors influencing food habits
  • Explore the six guiding principles to a trauma-informed approach to food and nutrition care
  • Describe guiding principles for dietitians performing community-engaged food and nutrition care, and research

Handouts:

Click here to view the recording


Celebration of Indigenous Food and Food Ways in Wisconsin

Join WAND in a celebration of Indigenous Food, Food Ways, and People Groups on Food Day with an exploration of the status of Tribal Health and Culture-centered care in WI, as well as, a fun and engaging cooking demonstration featuring indigenous foods of WI.

*Thank you WAND Southern Region for helping sponsor this event!

Program Outline

  • 4:30 PM - Welcome and Introduction
  • 4:40 PM - Background information Indigenous Foods, Food Ways, and Tribal Health
  • 5:10 PM - Cooking demonstration of 3 Sisters Soup with Smoked Turkey
  • 5:40 PM - Group question and answer session
  • 5:55 PM - Concluding remarks

About the Speaker

Elena Terry, Chef and Executive Director, is the founder and Executive Director of Wild Bearies, a nonprofit that she formed in 2018 to keep First Nation food traditions alive and help community members who are dealing with trauma or addiction. She is a consulting chef with the Intertribal Agriculture Council and a Ho-Chunk Tribal member.

This event is FREE for all WAND members and is approved for 1.5 CEUs. Register here.


Resources:

Foraging Practice and Cooking Demo: https://youtu.be/qA1EuKK22jM

Recipe (Stockbridge-Munsee Mohican Nation; Brock Schreiber)